Training

Lison BETTLER

I can still remember my first contact with violin-making. I was seven years old and I had entered a workshop to rent my first violin.
I was fascinated by the atmosphere and from then on I was determined to become a violin-maker. I entered the Mirecourt School
of violin-making in France at the age of fourteen and studied the making and restoration of violins for five years.
While I was studying I also acquired a number of valuable work experiences. After I obtained my diploma I worked for several years
as an assistant, most notably in the workshop of F. Becker in Montpellier. My interest in bows developed further during this time,
and I decided to train as a bow-maker under the direction of Mr. Becker. Wanting to take direction of my own future I opened
my workshop in Zaragoza, where I mainly devote myself to the making of new violins, violas and cellos. I am eager to exchange views
and expertise with other violin makers, and I am a member of Aladfi, a French violin-making association.

Etienne BELLANGER

I have played music and violin since my childhood, and this led me into my violin-making career. I learnt my craft at the French
violin-making school of Mirecourt, following earlier cabinet-making studies. Once I obtained my diploma I worked in several workshops
in France, among them those owned by S. Taveau, Friedrich Alber and Frédéric Becker. Through this experience, I involved myself more
and more in my craft, developing a high degree of rigor in my work, a wide range of violin making techniques, and my own aesthetic.
In my work I concentrate on understanding the specific needs of each musician, and on ensuring the ‘form’ of the instrument
(the choice of wood, arching, modeling etc) produces the desired sound. This involves finding the unique personal voice of the instrument,
inspired by the musicians that have influenced me so much over the years. I continue to evolve in my craft, regularly meeting with
colleagues, competing in violin-making competitions, and belonging to violin-making communities such as the French Association Aladfi.